About Us

Based in sunny Bournemouth UK, Really Small Computers are here to change the way you perceive the humble (and often LARGE) computer, customer service and satisfaction.

Having over 30 years’ experience in the electronics and computing markets with a very passionate emphasis on customer service, we own a small group of successful businesses in the IT and Electronics sector.

My name is Dan Bailey, owner and founder of Really Small Computers. I’m a qualified electronics engineer and started my career back in the 80s in analog electronics design and prototyping for a local company. This was when the real computer revolution started. After dabbling with legendary machines such as the ZX81, VIC20, ZX Spectrum and Amiga, like many people in the early 90s I bought a huge and massively expensive personal computer. I then joined the internet in 1995 on a trusty 14.4k modem.

In 2000 I designed and manufactured the FreeSpeed Pro, the first commercially available Athlon CPU overclocking card, which became a hit overnight with Ninja Micros selling over 10,000 units in just one year. Around this time I branched into software development with a small shareware app called EmotiPad, again becoming an overnight success on forums around the internet with in excess of 8000 registered users. EmotiPad has recently relaunched as a .NET coding exercise, but now is completely free to use.

In 2009 BikeVis was launched leveraging on electronics and IT knowledge to produce motorcycle safety products, and to date has invoiced over 14000 happy customers and growing.

Since 2009 we have also supplied computers locally but now want to specialize in what I regard to be the future of desktop computers and cater for the wider online market, hence Really Small Computers being born.

Please do not hesitate in contacting us with any computing questions, we are always here to help.

We plan to expand the shop greatly over the next few months and have many exciting plans so please stay tuned!.

Regards

Dan Bailey
Owner and Founder – Really Small Computers